Research Highlights: Ashley Bucsek

 

    
In situ, 3D EBSD-type reconstruction of NiTi polycrystal during load-biased thermal cycling Full reconstruction of embedded grain at elevated load and temperature


Ashley's research interests pertain to the experimental investigation of phase transformations using state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction techniques. Many of these techniques are still largely in the proof-of-concept stage, so Ashley is developing new tools and methodologies for adapting them for advanced material systems. These advanced material systems, such as shape memory alloys (SMAs), may undergo several elastic and inelastic deformation mechanisms simultaneously, spanning length scales from nm to mm. This has made experimental validation of micromechanical theories difficult in the past, but new diffraction techniques such as high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) can be used to nondestructively acquire grain- or subgrain-specific information across bulk specimens, including orientation, strain, and topology. Examples of this are shown for both single- and polycrystal specimens. These types of in situ, 3D experimental investigations are critical for the validation of existing micromechanical models and the future engineering implementation of advanced material systems. More about Ashley>>
 

Strain response of martensite reorientation to single monoclinic crystals Martensite twin evolution during martensite reorientation

 

Stress-induced martensite reorientation in a NiTi single crystal
                                                
                                                                                

 

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Last Updated: 09/19/2017 10:41:55